Tag Archives: tutorial

tutorial: digital photo film effect

Have you noticed that black and white film, especially older film, has a slight green tinge that distinguishes it from black and white digital photography? I prefer the softness film provides to the harsh gray scale of desaturating a digital image in photo processing software.

Since I use PicMonkey for most of my photo editing, I thought I’d share an easy tutorial on how to make your digital images look like black and white film prints.

1. Open your image in PicMonkey.

1

2. Click on the Effects button (it looks like a flask), then click on the Black and White effect located under the Basics category. Click Apply.

2

3. Scroll down to the Time Machine effect, select Trixi, and move the saturation tab to somewhere in the 70-80% range.

3

4. Go to the Basic Edits category and click Exposure. Adjust theĀ brightness and shadows tabs to achieve desired amount of contrast. It helps to zoom in on the focal point of your image for this part.

4

5. If cropping is desired, click on Crop and adjust to your heart’s content. I typically set the crop tool to Original Proportions or 4×6.

5

6. Congratulations! Black and white film perfection.

coffee shop


Compare to a real black and white film image:

babb

Advertisements

diy: velvet skirt

It took me almost 5 hours to complete this relatively simple elastic waist skirt, mostly because I’m horrible at sewing; I’m impatient and make a lot of mistakes as a result. But it’s finished! And I think I’ll actually wear it.

velvet skirt

When I saw this fabric at Jo-Ann Fabrics, I recalled American Apparel’s version. Although this velvet isn’t as thick or supple, it still has a nice texture. (P.S. I have some velvet pieces for sale at Water Lily Thrift if you’d rather buy than make a piece for yourself.)

velvet skirtI didn’t follow a pattern. I purchased a yard of fabric (which I had to cut down by about a quarter or a third yard to keep the elastic waist from getting too thick), cropped it to hit at mid-thigh, and sewed a casing for the elastic. I had major trouble with the elastic waist because the knit elastic I purchased kept folding over inside the casing; I recommend buying woven elastic, as it’s a bit sturdier. I used a safety pin fastened to the end of the elastic to push it through the casing.

I left the hem unfinished, as the fabric curls under naturally, but I may finish it off when I get the energy to work on it again.

The total cost for this project was about $10.00. Not super cheap but less than American Apparel’s $38.00 price tag.

Sources: American Apparel skirt, Outfit

diy: studded pullover

I bought a plain pullover on clearance originally intending to embellish it like this one. But when I got to the craft store, the only iron-on animal applique that caught my eye was the same one used in the tutorial and I really didn’t want a shiny fox. I wanted something cool, like a deer or an un-shiny fox.

I brainstormed for entirely too long while walking up and down the aisles of Jo-Ann Fabrics, then found myself back in the applique aisle, considering studded shoulders. I took the plunge, buying two sheets of iron-on studs. The next evening, The Clothes Horse was wearing an ASOS studded-shoulder pullover and I knew I’d made the right decision.

the clothes horse studsstudded pullover diySupplies: Plain pullover, Iron-on studs, Iron

studded shoulder pulloverI caution you against buying a mini iron for, although it was invented specifically for use with iron-on appliques, it doesn’t get hot enough to achieve satisfactory results. It took far too long to convince the glue to melt and the studs to stick. Some are still loose. I should have purchased a regular iron.